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Undergraduate Calendar 2011|12

Human Services Major

Bachelor of Professional Arts
Human Services Major

Regulations effective September 1, 2011.

The Bachelor of Professional Arts Human Services major is offered by Athabasca University’s Centre for Social Sciences.

The program responds to the career and professional needs of career practitioners in the human services fields of early childhood education, child and youth care, rehabilitation services, and other closely related fields such as teacher assistants and counsellors. The program complements the diploma programs offered at community colleges in Alberta and across Canada.

Enrolment Requirements

The BPA Human Services major is available to:

  • graduates of an approved two-year human services related diploma;
  • graduates of a previous undergraduate university degree in an unrelated discipline (with at least one year of professional practice relevant to the Human Services major); or,
  • students with a minimum of two years of university-level coursework (with at least one year of professional practice relevant to the Human Services major).

Coursework and credentials must have been obtained from a college, university or institute of technology approved by Athabasca University. Individuals who have questions about the eligibility of their previous education for admission are strongly encouraged to contact the program coordinator.

Program Planning

Students are strongly encouraged to plan an individualized program of study to

  • consolidate and formalize their previous learning
  • build on their existing knowledge
  • broaden their knowledge base
  • explore areas of interest, and
  • prepare themselves for future education and career choices.

Plan your program of study carefully to ensure that you meet all of the degree requirements. A maximum of 12 credits may be completed at the 200 level including any 200-level courses in the required common core. You must also complete a minimum of 18 credits at the 400 level, including at least 9 credits in Human Services. If you need assistance, or for general information regarding the Human Services major, please contact the program coordinator.

Prior Learning

Some students may qualify for

  1. a maximum of 60 credits of Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) towards entry to this program, or,
  2. a maximum of 30 credits may be awarded toward the remaining credits in the program.

To learn more about PLAR opportunities within the Human Services major, please contact your program coordinator or the Centre for Learning Accreditation.

Program Learning Outcomes

Athabasca University has developed program learning outcomes that describe the career options that may be available to you upon graduating.

Classroom Setting

In addition to completing this degree through online and distance learning, you may have the option to take courses for the Bachelor of Professional Arts (Human Services) in a classroom setting at other institutions. See Learning Services Collaborations for more information.

To Bachelor of Professional Arts program.

Students must complete the following degree requirements within the Bachelor of Professional Arts program.

Program Structure
Common Core credits 12
Major Courses credits 36
Options credits 12
Residency requirement. A minimum of 30 credits must be obtained through Athabasca University. 30
Graduation with Distinction or Great Distinction. At least 24 credits must be obtained through Athabasca University in order to be considered. 24
Maximum Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition credits
*see Prior Learning above
up to 60 credits towards entry or up to 30 after entry

 

Major Courses (36 credits)

Student must complete six required courses and six additional courses; two chosen from each of the following three themes: Leadership, Public Policy Contexts, and A Changing Environment.

Required Courses (6 credits)
HSRV 311 Practice and Policy in the Human Services (3)
HSRV 322 Ideology and Policy Evolution (3)
Electives Courses (select 12 credits from the following)
CRJS 491 Offender Rehabilitation (3)
EDUC 341 Topics in the History of Childhood and Education (in development) (3)
EDUC/HRMT 406 Work and Learning (3)
GOVN 380/HSRV 363 Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Governance (3)
HADM 315 Health and Community Development
(3)
HADM 369 Health Policy in Canada (3)
HSRV/HADM 339 Organization of the Canadian Health Care System (3)
HSRV/CRJS 350 Community Policing (3)
HSRV/WGST 421 Advocacy from the Margins (3)
HSRV/CRJS 427 Civil Liberties and Individual Rights (3)
HSRV 433 Directed Reading I: Topics in the Human Services (3)
HSRV 455 Project Design I (3)
HSRV 477 Project Implementation I (3)
HSRV 487/
CRJS 489/ LGST 489
Alternative Dispute Resolution (3)
INST 377 Topics in Aboriginal Government (3)
INST 460 Management of Indigenous Institutions and Organizations (3)
LBST 200 Introduction to Labour Studies (3)
ORGB 300 Organizational Culture (3)
ORGB 364 Organizational Behaviour (3)
ORGB/HRMT 386 Introduction to Human Resource Management (3)
PSYC 323 Developmental Psychology (3)
PSYC 340 Introduction to Applied Social Psychology (3)
PSYC 350 Adolescent Psychology (3)
PSYC 356 Introduction to Personality Theories and Issues (3)
PSYC 379 Social Psychology (3)
PSYC 388 Introduction to Counselling (3)
PSYC/EDPY 389 Learning Disabilities: Issues and Interventions (3)
PSYC 405 Creating a Working Alliance (3)
PSYC 426 Psychology of Families and Parenting (3)
PSYC/EDPY 469 Principles of Psychological Assessment (3)
SOCI 300 Organizations and Society: How to Make Sense of Modern Organizational Life (3)
SOCI 305 Sociology and Crime (3)
WGST 266 Thinking From Women’s Lives: An Introduction to Women’s Studies (3)
WGST 310 Feminist Approaches to Counselling Women (3)

 

Additional 18 Credits.
Select six credits from each theme.

The six theme-related courses create a strong multidisciplinary knowledge base in the areas of leadership, policy contexts and the rapidly changing world in which high-quality human service delivery occurs. The major courses offer a mix of traditional management and public administration along with innovative approaches that provide other possibilities for responding to rapid social change.

Students may select courses that will broaden and deepen their understanding or specialize, for example, by choosing aboriginal content or women’s and gender studies courses. With permission of the program coordinator other courses may be substituted under the theme headings to complement student's individualized program of study.

Eighteen credits must be completed at the 400 level. Students are advised to plan their program of study carefully to ensure that they meet all of the degree requirements.

 

Theme One: Leadership

Select 6 credits from the following outline. These courses emphasize communications, management, finance and social change.

ACCT 250 Accounting for Managers

or

any 200-level accounting course
(3)
CMNS 385/SOCI 378 Social Problems and Social Movements (3)
COMM 243 Interpersonal Communication (3)
ECON/HADM 321 Health Care Economics (3)
GOVN/GLST 450 Public Budgeting and Financial Management in a Globalized World (3)
HADM 488 Risk Management and Safety in Health Services (3)
HLST 320 Teaching and Learning for Health Professionals (3)
HRMT/ORGB 386 Introduction to Human Resource Management (3)
HSRV/CMNS 321 Computing in Everyday Life (3)
HSRV/GOVN/POLI 400 Governance and Leadership (3)
HSRV/CRJS 493 Risk Assessment and Threat Management (3)
INST 358 Aboriginal Women in Canada (3)
INST 450 Financial Management for First Nations Institutions and Organizations (3)
INST 470 Leadership in Indigenous Institutions and Organizations (3)
LBST/SOCI/WGST 332 Women and Unions (3)
ORGB 326 Organization Theory (3)
ORGB 364 Organizational Behaviour (3)
ORGB 390 Managing Change (3)
PSYC/EDPY 470 Consultation and Collaboration for Students with Special Needs (3)
PSYC/EDPY 471 Managing Behaviour Problems in the Classroom (3)
SOCI 300 Organizations and Society: How to Make Sense of Modern Organizational Life (3)
WGST 302 Communication Skills – Feminist Practice (3)
WGST 422 Violence against Women: A Global Perspective (3)

 

Theme Two: Public Policy Contexts

Select six credits from the following outline. These courses emphasize government, law, society and healthy communities.

GLST/GOVN 403 Public Policy in a Global Era (3)
GOVN 390/POLI 392 Public Policy and Administrative Governance (3)
HADM 336 Community Health Planning (3)
HADM 369 Health Policy in Canada (3)
HSRV/HADM 315 Health and Community Development (3)
HSRV/HADM 326 Health Issues: Health and Healing (3)
HSRV/CRJS 352 Victims of Crime (3)
HSRV 401/HADM 400 Health Care Law (3)
HSRV/CRJS 427 Civil Liberties and Individual Rights (3)
INST 426 Aboriginal Government and Law (3)
INST 430 Indigenous Governance (3)
LBST 413 What do Unions Do? (3)
LGST 249 Legal Literacy (3)
LGST 310/ IDRL 309 Human Rights, the Charter and Labour Relations (3)
LGST 331 Administrative Law (3)
LGST 390 Women, Equality and the Law (3)
POLI 309 Canadian Government and Politics (3)
POLI 311 Aboriginal Politics and Governments (3)
POLI 330 International and Global Politics (3)
POLI 350 Women in Canadian Politics (3)
POLI 383 Canadian Political Economy in a Global Era (3)
SOCI 329 Aging and You: An Introduction to Gerontology (I) (3)
WGST 400/HIST 401 Feminism in the Western Tradition 1790s – 1940s (3)
WGST 401 Contemporary Feminist Theory (3)

 

Theme Three: A Changing Environment

Select six credits from the following outline. These courses emphasize holistic approaches to communities, roots and sources, and methodology and research.

CMNS 421 Being Online (3)
EDUC 301 Educational Issues and Social Change I: Historical Social Perspectives (3)
HADM 369 Health Policy in Canada (3)
HSRV/CMNS 420 Topics in Communication: Children and Media (3)
HSRV/CRJS 352 Victims of Crime (3)
HSRV/CRJS 410 Special Needs Policing (3)
HSRV/CMNS/GOVN 444 Media Relations (3)
IDRL 308 Occupational Health and Safety (3)
INST 342 Issues in Native Education (in development) (3)
INST 358 Aboriginal Women in Canada (3)
INST/HIST 369 History of Canada’s First Nations from 1830 (3)
INST/HIST 370 The Métis (3)
INST 480 Comparative Indigenous Models of Government: International Models (3)
LBST 331 Women, Workers, and Farmers: Histories of North American Popular Resistance (3)
POEC 393 Canada and the Global Economy (3)
PSYC 345 The Psychology of Women (3)
PSYC 347 Introduction to Feminist Counselling (3)
PSYC/EDPY 389 Learning Disabilities: Issues and Interventions (3)
PSYC/EDPY 400 Teaching and Managing the Child with Learning Difficulties (6)
PSYC 476 Assistive Technologies for Students with Special Needs (3)
SOCI 380 Canadian Ethnic Relations (3)
SOCI 435 Theories of Social Change (3)
SOCI 450 Environmental Sociology (3)
SOSC 366 Research Methods in the Social Sciences (3)
WGST 200 Feminist Research and Women’s Lives (3)
WGST 303 Issues in Women’s Health (3)

 

Options (12 credits)

Select 12 additional credits in any discipline at the senior (300/400) level. Students should select electives with a view to fulfilling the general degree requirements.

Notes: Please ensure your course selection meets the general degree requirements, especially the requirements of completing 18 credits at the 400 level, including at least 9 credits in Human Services.

Contact Advising Services to ensure your course selection complies with the degree requirements. Use a program planner to record your selections and track your process.

 

Information effective Sept. 1, 2011 to Aug. 31, 2012.

Updated September 18, 2013